Jesus Is Lord Archives

Between The Cross And The Empty Tomb

Easter CrossWe are so quick to rush to Sunday and the resurrection that we don’t stop to think about what it was like for Christ’s followers on Saturday. For us Saturday is a day of waiting because we know what happens on Sunday. But for the disciples it was a day of mourning that undoubtedly left them with feelings of hopelessness.

Something deep in their guts cried, “No more!”

  • No more miracles – Jesus is dead.
  • No more healing of broken bodies – Jesus is dead.
  • No more stories about the Kingdom – Jesus is dead.
  • No more Messiah – Jesus is dead.
  • No more water of life – the river is dry.
  • No more bread of life – the oven is cold.
  • Only shadows – no more light.
  • Only the eerie quietness after the passing of a storm.
  • Only death – a tomb – emptiness – hopelessness.

We know the end of the story that they were soon to learn. That they would soon be able to say, “The Lord is risen” and respond with “He is risen indeed!” We know their hope is restored when they encounter the risen Christ.

But, let’s not rush to the empty tomb just yet.

Let’s take some time today and try to feel the pain, the emptiness, the lostness. Let’s try to identify with those all around us who have not yet found the hope of the resurrection.

Pause on this Saturday and as best as possible feel the hopelessness of a world without Jesus.

Related Posts from 7 Days Leading Up To Easter

    1. Sunday – What Kind Of Entry Was It?
    2. Monday – 12 Things Children Can Teach Us This Easter
    3. Tuesday – Seeing The Unnoticed
    4. Wednesday – The Calm Before The Storm
    5. Thursday – How Washing The Disciple’s Feet Pictures The Incarnation
    6. Friday – It’s Friday But . . .
    7. Saturday – Between The Cross And The Empty Tomb

      It’s Friday But…

      Igniter Media Group describes their video Sunday’s Comin with these words:

      The story of Jesus Christ’s crucifixion is one of betrayal, brutality, despair, and pain. Yet we know even before His death that redemption was promised to be coming soon. We know that the story does not end at the cross. We know what many did not realize — that Sunday’s comin’.

      Watch here as Pastor John L. Jefferson narrates . . .

      It's Friday But Sunday's Comin

      Related Posts from 7 Days Leading Up To Easter

      1. Sunday – What Kind Of Entry Was It?
      2. Monday – 12 Things Children Can Teach Us This Easter
      3. Tuesday – Seeing The Unnoticed
      4. Wednesday – The Calm Before The Storm
      5. Thursday – How Washing The Disciple’s Feet Pictures The Incarnation
      6. Friday – It’s Friday But . . .
      7. Saturday – Between The Cross And The Empty Tomb

      Foot WashingOn Thursday of the final week in the life of Jesus we have the stories of the upper room where Jesus observed the Passover meal, washed the disciple’s feet and instituted the meal of the new covenant. John records a long section of the teachings of Jesus in chapters 14-17. We also have the stories of the betrayal by Judas, Jesus praying in Gethsemane, his arrest and illegal night trial conducted by the Jewish Sanhedrin.

      Today I want to focus on Jesus washing the feet of the disciples in the upper room as recorded in John 13:1-17 and view it as a picture of the incarnation. We will compare it with Philippians 2:5-11.

      1. Jesus knew that he had come from God and was going to God
        • Jesus is in very nature God
      2. Jesus got up from the meal
        • Jesus, not considering his equality with God something to be grasped, got up from his position of eternal, pre-existent equality with God
      3. Jesus lay aside his outer clothing
        • Jesus left his splendor and glory with the Father
      4. Jesus wrapped a towel around his waist
        • Jesus clothed himself with humanity
      5. Jesus took the position of a slave and washed the disciple’s feet
        • Jesus made himself nothing, taking the very nature of a servant
      6. Jesus finished his task, put on his clothes and returned to the table
        • Jesus finished his work on earth, ascended to the Father and was exalted to the highest place

      So what does this have to do with us?

      After washing their feet, Jesus told the disciples:

      “You call me ‘Teacher’ and ‘Lord,’ and rightly so, for that is what I am. Now that I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also should wash one another’s feet. I have set you an example that you should do as I have done for you. I tell you the truth, no servant is greater than his master, nor is a messenger greater than the one who sent him. Now that you know these things, you will be blessed if you do them. – John 13:13-17 NIV

      Jesus does not call us to sit around discussing the mystery of the incarnation. He calls us to live out that mystery.

      He lives in us. The church is his body in the world today.

      We are to incarnate the community – and wash feet.

      Grace and Peace,
      Terry

      Related Posts from 7 Days Leading Up To Easter

      1. Sunday – What Kind Of Entry Was It?
      2. Monday – 12 Things Children Can Teach Us This Easter
      3. Tuesday – Seeing The Unnoticed
      4. Wednesday – The Calm Before The Storm
      5. Thursday – How Washing The Disciple’s Feet Pictures The Incarnation
      6. Friday – It’s Friday But . . .
      7. Saturday – Between The Cross And The Empty Tomb

      Sent from the Father

      The word sent is used at least 40 times in the Gospel of John. Jesus often defines himself in his mission as the one who was sent and tells us that the Father  is the one who sent him. Below are 6 of those times Jesus refers to himself as being sent from the Father.

      1. He who does not honor the Son does not honor the Father, who sent him. (John 5:23)
      2. I tell you the truth, whoever hears my word and believes him who sent me has eternal life and will not be condemned; he has crossed over from death to life. (John 5:24)
      3. By myself I can do nothing; I judge only as I hear, and my judgment is just, for I seek not to please myself but him who sent me. (John 5:30)
      4. And the Father who sent me has himself testified concerning me. (John 5:37)
        Jesus answered, “The work of God is this: to believe in the one he has sent.” (John 6:29)
      5. And this is the will of him who sent me, that I shall lose none of all that he has given me, but raise them up at the last day. (John 6:39)
      6. As long as it is day, we must do the work of him who sent me. Night is coming, when no one can work. (John 9:4)

      You can search your Bible for other passages where Jesus tells us he is sent from the Father, but spend a little time now and reflect on the 6 listed above.

      Grace and Peace,
      Terry

      Join the conversation: What insight do you gain from these scripture passages?